Capital Expenditure Requests

Capital Expenditure Requests

At Flowingly, we work with every kind of process and organization. Capital expenditure requests are universally one of the most critical of all processes. Organizations must be able to consistently and responsibly manage the approval of large and enduring financial decisions.

Depending on organizational specifics, there are many variations in capital expenditure approval processes. It is essential it remains easy to understand. The CAPEX request process is too important to allow ambiguity or overcomplexity to sneak in.

1. Project Details Initiator
The first step in any CAPEX request process is to gather the information that will help to determine the costs and relative benefits of the expense. The ‘Request Details’ step of the CAPEX request gives the Initiator the opportunity to provide risks, benefits, alternatives, and any other detail to support their suggested expenditure.
2.  Project Costing Finance
Core to all capital expenditure request processing is the communication of the relative benefits of the expenditure. This step documents its cost and ongoing value. Costs are itemized and the residual value is recorded. It also provides an opportunity for the Finance team to comment on the request.  
2.  Project Costing Finance
Core to all capital expenditure request processing is the communication of the relative benefits of the expenditure. This step documents its cost and ongoing value. Costs are itemized and the residual value is recorded. It also provides an opportunity for the Finance team to comment on the request.  
3. Management Review Management
Once the official costing of the project is complete, the Management team or CAPEX committee can meet to discuss, review, and make recommendations based on the information. Once the expense is approved by the group, it can move to the final signoff from the CFO or CEO. 
4. CFO Review CFO
CAPEX requests then flow through the office of the CFO for official approval. This step may then trigger a process within the office to include the expense in financial documentation.
4. CFO Review CFO
CAPEX requests then flow through the office of the CFO for official approval. This step may then trigger a process within the office to include the expense in financial documentation.
5. CEO Approval CEO
For unbudgeted or high-cost expenditure, it is common to route the request to the CEO for final approval. This step is as much about keeping the CEO informed of capital expenditure as it is about receiving approval.
6. Purchase Order Finance
Finally, the Finance team can begin their own internal process to raise a purchase order for the asset. Once this is completed, the expenditure can be made.
6. Purchase Order Finance
Finally, the Finance team can begin their own internal process to raise a purchase order for the asset. Once this is completed, the expenditure can be made.

This is an excerpt from Flowingly’s latest process guide, Essential Processes for Finance.

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Onboard & Induct A New Employee

Onboard & Induct A New Employee

A quality onboarding experience is the single most important step to getting a new staff member to an operational level quickly. Sadly, this is a process that many organizations only pay lip-service to.

If you’ve been lucky enough to join a company with an exceptional onboarding experience, you’ll know just how powerful it is. The benefits are endless. Better understanding of company culture. Improved grasp of responsibilities. Increased performance through better training. Decreased time to becoming fully operational.

1. Send Welcome Email and Request New Employee’s Details Manager
What better way to kick-off the new employee’s experience than with an email welcoming them to the company! This is a great way to introduce them to the company culture and set the tone for what they can expect going forward.

Use this opportunity to request the employee’s details, such as their tax details, superannuation info or their working visa. This will save you more time on their first day.

    2. Complete New Employee Basic Information Manager
    Once the manager has the employee’s basic information, they can collate it into a standardized form for the HR team. When building this process, it is the responsibility of the HR team to outline exactly what they require to process a new employee. If it’s not outlined in the process, the manager will not know what is required.
    2. Complete New Employee Basic Information Manager
    Once the manager has the employee’s basic information, they can collate it into a standardized form for the HR team. When building this process, it is the responsibility of the HR team to outline exactly what they require to process a new employee. If it’s not outlined in the process, the manager will not know what is required.
    3. Approve Employee Paperwork & Enter in HR System Human Resources
    This step is where the HR team enters the provided details into their systems. The first action is to check that all the requested details have been entered correctly. If not, the process can be sent back to the manager to fix.

    We use a combination of a task list and an approval in this step. This could be split into two, however the best processes are nice and simple. This creates no unnecessary wastage and less admin.

    4. Prepare Employee’s Desk and Laptop IT Services
    Now that the basic information has been covered, it’s time to setup the employee’s tool-of-trade. IT can simply come in and follow a quick checklist outlining what the employee requires. A handy addition to this step would be a quick video on desk ergonomics!

    Optional extra: Some companies may require a stack of software to be setup for the new employee. If this is the case, additional fields can be used to inform IT of the required software. This removes the hassle of back-and-forth emails over logins during the first couple of weeks.

    4. Prepare Employee’s Desk and Laptop IT Services
    Now that the basic information has been covered, it’s time to setup the employee’s tool-of-trade. IT can simply come in and follow a quick checklist outlining what the employee requires. A handy addition to this step would be a quick video on desk ergonomics!

    Optional extra: Some companies may require a stack of software to be setup for the new employee. If this is the case, additional fields can be used to inform IT of the required software. This removes the hassle of back-and-forth emails over logins during the first couple of weeks.

    5. Issue New Employee Items Administration
    It’s now Day 1 of the employee’s new job and they require some basic items to become a fully-functional employee. Things you might want to include here:
    • Mobile phone and charger
    • Security door key
    • Swipe card

    If you’re more advanced with your processes, you would link this up with your employee exit process. This would allow you to mark off these items as returned at the end of employment.

    6. Complete Activities by End of Week 1 New Employee
    As we all know, the first week at a company can be a bit of a blur. Most organizations have a standardized approach. This step of the process should be a simple checklist, where the employee can check off that they have been introduced to the team, gone through an H&S induction, had their photo taken and more.
    6. Complete Activities by End of Week 1 New Employee
    As we all know, the first week at a company can be a bit of a blur. Most organizations have a standardized approach. This step of the process should be a simple checklist, where the employee can check off that they have been introduced to the team, gone through an H&S induction, had their photo taken and more.
    7. Complete Activities by End of Month 1 New Employee
    The key to an effective onboarding is having specific timings and goals. It is important for the manager to set aside time to understand how the employee is tracking and to give them feedback and coaching. Many businesses have their new employees spend time with different parts of the company. The end of month 1 is a great time to get together and review the key takeaways that the employee has had in their first few weeks. This step may include a review of what the employee has learned and opportunities for company improvement that they have seen with fresh eyes.
    8. Complete Activities by End of Months 2 & 3 New Employee
    By now the employee should be progressing to an operational stage. This is a good chance for the employee to review their learnings and sit down with their manager to evaluate their progress. It is important to capture feedback at this step. This will help management understand the effectiveness of the onboarding process, and whether it requires further improvement.
    8. Complete Activities by End of Months 2 & 3 New Employee
    By now the employee should be progressing to an operational stage. This is a good chance for the employee to review their learnings and sit down with their manager to evaluate their progress. It is important to capture feedback at this step. This will help management understand the effectiveness of the onboarding process, and whether it requires further improvement.

    This is an excerpt from Flowingly’s process guide, Essential Processes for Human Resources.

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    Request Access to Applications

    Request Access to Applications

    Many companies run this process informally, often using email. This approach can work with 10 employees in the same office. But what about when you have 100 employees? What if they start working remotely? As soon as your business progresses past being able to swivel your chair to talk to the admin of the application, you need to develop a proper request process. 

    1. Select the Required Applications Initiator
    It’s common for remote employees to suddenly find that they no longer have access to something they regularly used in the office. Luckily, in the age of cloud-based applications, accessing software from anywhere is easier than ever. The first step of this process is for the employee to highlight what they need access too. Bonus tip: this step also works really well when onboarding a new employee, you’d just have it as a step for their manager. 

    2. Set Up XYZ Accounts Various
    When companies run this process informally using email, things get missed By having a full list of services in a single place, life is made far more simple for the employee and the IT team supporting them. The great thing about using workflow software to process these requests is that it directs the request down the right channel instantly. No more “Hey Sam, do you know who the admin for Slack is?” 

    3. Login and Go! Initiator
    The final step of this simple process is for the employee to check that your logins all work. Have them mark off that they’re all logged in and ready to go.  

    This is an excerpt from Flowingly’s latest process guide, Essential Processes for Remote Work.

    Proven processes to help you manage a remote workforce.

    Discover the building blocks for constructing a strong remote culture.

    Request to Work Remotely

    Request to Work Remotely

    Before staff start working remotely, most organizations will need to approve it. This process has two main benefits. Firstly, the organization can ensure that managerial approval is in place, and secondly, they get a full record of all remote staff for HR and health & safety purposes. This is a simple approval process, that can be modified to suit many other applications. 
    1. Submit Details of Request Initiator
    The trigger for starting this process is an employee request to work remotely. This step is a good opportunity to capture all the relevant details about the request, from the dates requested to their job title (you may have a list of titles which are approved for remote work). 

    It’s important at this step to capture the reason for the request, along with an outline of the working location, including the address, details about the environment and whether the staff member requires any equipment that they don’t already have. 

    2. Manager Approval Initiator Manager
    This is a simple approval but provides an opportunity for longer requests to be approved by the employee’s manager before they get submitted for approval to higher levels (e.g. the CEO). If the manager feels anything is missing from the application, it’s good to have an option to just send back to the previous step and let the employee know what is missing.
    3. CEO Approval CEO
    Depending on the size and structure of your company, you will have different rules around approvals. Many companies will allow an employee’s direct manager to make the call on shorter requests for remote work, while longer requests need to go through higher level of approval (as seen here).  
    4. Start “Set Up Your Remote Workspace” Process Initiator
    Once the request has been approved, it’s important to make sure the employee has a quality remote workspace setup that meets company regulations for health & safety. For this reason, the last step of the approval process should link directly to the “Set up your remote workspace” process. 

    This is an excerpt from Flowingly’s latest process guide, Essential Processes for Remote Work.

    Proven processes to help you manage a remote workforce.

    Discover the building blocks for constructing a strong remote culture.

    Set Up Your Remote Workspace

    Set Up Your Remote Workspace

    Whether your employees are in the office or working remotely, it’s important that their workspace inspires quality work and is safe to work for an extended period.
    1. Set Up Your Workstation Initiator
    First off, your remote employee needs a workstation that meets your company’s health & safety guidelines. The first step for an employee initiating the process should be the setup of their workstation in compliance with recommended ergonomics. This is a good opportunity to insert instructions or a video outlining the correct setup, along with inspiration on how to optimize their workspace.
    2. Read & Sign the “Remote Work Agreement” Initiator
    It is important to have a Remote Work Agreement for your organization. This is an opportunity to outline the expectations of both the employee and the employer. It’s also a good idea to cover off escalation procedures, communication requirements, and other essentials. If you’re using a workflow application such as Flowingly, the employee can download the agreement and sign it from here.
    3. Conduct PC / Laptop check Initiator
    With remote workers, it’s more important than ever to make sure that they have quality equipment and adequate security measures in place. At a basic level, your IT team will want to check that the device they are using is sufficient to run the required applications. IT may also need to make sure that sufficient security software is installed and that 2-factor authentication is being used. Finally, they will need to ensure that you have easy access to your systems and files, be that through VPN or other means.

    4. Check VPN Connection Works Initiator
    The last thing your employee will need to do is make sure that the connection that was set up is working seamlessly.

    This is an excerpt from Flowingly’s latest process guide, Essential Processes for Remote Work.

    Proven processes to help you manage a remote workforce.

    Discover the building blocks for constructing a strong remote culture.

    The Remote Work Software Blueprint

    The Remote Work Software Blueprint

    There are thousands of software platforms available to help you work from home, but which are really worth your time?

    We’ve compiled a list of our 9 favorite platforms for remote work, the ones we really couldn’t work without.

    1. Zoom – Video Conferencing
    Zoom helps your team hold video meetings easily. It’s perfect for internal and external meetings since participants simply click a link to join the call.

    2. Calendly – Scheduling
    Change your meeting availability on the go and allow attendees to reschedule with ease with Calendly. Bonus tip: it has a great Zoom integration.

    3. Trello – Task Management
    Trello is an easy way to manage your tasks and projects. With various plugins, you can customize your boards to suit the way you work.

    4. Naverisk – Remote IT
    Naverisk helps IT teams deliver consistent service from anywhere in the world. It’s an impressive all-in-one IT services automation platform that keeps your systems running smoothly and accessible from the cloud.

    Flowingly helps us deploy custom process systems in under a day.

    5. Flowingly – Process Management
    Make all of your processes and workflows accessible remotely. Run any process you want from home, from onboarding and training a new staff member, to processing a new sale. Added bonus: Flowingly gives you full visibility of where all your processes are sitting, and who they are sitting with. 

    6. Intercom – Customer Engagement
    Engage with customers and leads in real-time from anywhere using Intercom. Bonus tip: it can be set up to route conversations down the right channels, whether that is a help article or direct contact with sales or support. 

    7. Canva – Graphic Collaboration
    Collaborate on and share graphic designs in real-time with Canva. The perfect tool for de-centralizing your graphic creation, while still maintaining your brand style. 

    8. Slack – Internal Communication
    Slack is perfect for remote teams as it enables 1:1, team and topic-based communication. Bonus tip for pros: you can integrate other platforms to alert your team upon certain events e.g. when a new customer is registered in Salesforce, Slack will automatically let your team know. 

    9. Cognism – Contact Data
    Sales teams need contact data remotely? Lookup any business or prospect using Cognism, and even add them to a cold email sequence.

    Have a suggestion? We’d love to hear about the software you just can’t work without.